• Free From Desire

    Date posted: October 9, 2008 Author: jolanta
    It doesn’t seem like a good idea for one to always talk about her work, especially when she talks to no one but her computer. But I still want to talk about my creative process, and things like emotions, time, flaws, and creativity. These phrases have been occupying my mind, like a shrub growing, and its branches suddenly soften becoming some kind of grume, making it impossible to tell branches from leaves; then it starts to rain, dissolving everything. Everything becomes liquefied, a small stream that flows with bizarre substance, reflecting light, sparkling. The stream flows by noisy city roads and quiet places, trying to permeate everything with which it comes in contact. Its way is simple but unique. How I want to hold it, to make it my own power. Image

    Qin Jin

    Image
    Qin Jin, 29 years plus 8 months and 9 days, 2006. Performance video installation. Courtesy of Orange Gallery.

    It doesn’t seem like a good idea for one to always talk about her work, especially when she talks to no one but her computer. But I still want to talk about my creative process, and things like emotions, time, flaws, and creativity. These phrases have been occupying my mind, like a shrub growing, and its branches suddenly soften becoming some kind of grume, making it impossible to tell branches from leaves; then it starts to rain, dissolving everything. Everything becomes liquefied, a small stream that flows with bizarre substance, reflecting light, sparkling. The stream flows by noisy city roads and quiet places, trying to permeate everything with which it comes in contact. Its way is simple but unique. How I want to hold it, to make it my own power.

    An artist’s creative process should be based on instincts. It should be straightforward, no matter the means. Of course there is an intellectual element involved—sophisticated and shifting. The process involves personal experience and sentiments, all of these original! A few years ago when I wrote an essay about Hooper, I admired his great determination and felt he was like a persistent lonely farmer who went deep into a forest looking for valuable herbs that had never been found in his “desolate American world,” which made him different from his contemporaries. Although his findings might be rough, they were definitely creative! He was so immersed in life, in every detail of the time he lived in, but not affected by temptations, leaving what I call “the irreplaceable footsteps.” My art stems from my memory beginning from a certain age when I first developed my point of view. From my paintings and charcoal sketches from 2003 to performance pieces and installations, to the most recent photography, I have been trying to look for every detail, acting like a detective to trace my thoughts, in order to stay clear-headed and keep moving on with my artistic pursuit.

    Subtraction and hiding are another way of Hooper. It is also the best way to describe the mental projection of modern society. My works have the same mental projection because I am part of society. In a materialistic time like ours, I am not sure how many “Qin Jins” will be produced in fission. Maybe it is wise to choose subtraction, to get rid of materialistic wants. A tiny crack is where I want to live; I don’t escape nor do I emerge, which is probably for the best. I always have a fantasy: I just want to live in a very narrow place, the narrower the better, so narrow there’s only room for one person to lie down. That would be my paradise!
     

    Comments are closed.